The Book Munkie

Finally have a moment alone to get situated in my hotel room. It’s been a long day. A few moments to breathe and then off for a team dinner.

And more importantly more airport reading time for “The Death Cure”.

Blergh. In cab on my way to JFK for a quickie work trip.

Really wish I didn’t have to go but at least I have a hotel room to get massive amounts of homework done tonight.

WhaAaaat?! I just saw a Godzilla commercial with Bryan Cranston.

How had I not heard of this before?

^%$!&$&@#
Accidentally deleted what I had already written for my review. But it pretty much boils down to this, TRUST NO ONE. 
Thoroughly enjoyed the second book in The Maze Runner series. Normally I feel like book two is a weak link in series, but I found this much more engrossing than the first. If I didn’t already have the third book downloaded, I think I would have cried out in frustration on the train. 
GoodReads Rating: 4 stars (I really like it).
18/52
Up now: “The Death Cure” by James Dashner

^%$!&$&@#

Accidentally deleted what I had already written for my review. But it pretty much boils down to this, TRUST NO ONE. 

Thoroughly enjoyed the second book in The Maze Runner series. Normally I feel like book two is a weak link in series, but I found this much more engrossing than the first. If I didn’t already have the third book downloaded, I think I would have cried out in frustration on the train. 

GoodReads Rating: 4 stars (I really like it).

18/52

Up now: “The Death Cure” by James Dashner

weeklylizard:

“‎The game had started. Everybody was assuring everybody else how reliable they were. In fact, nobody trusted anybody but themselves” 
― Henning Mankell, The White Lioness
The execution-style murder of a Swedish housewife looks like a simple case even though there is no obvious suspect. But then Wallander learns of a determined stalker, and soon enough, the cops catch up with him. But when his alibi turns out to be airtight, they realize that what seemed a simple crime of passion is actually far more complex—and dangerous. The search for the truth behind the killing eventually uncovers an assassination plot, and Wallander soon finds himself in a tangle with both the secret police and a ruthless foreign agent. Combining compelling insights into the sinister side of modern life with a riveting tale of international intrigue, The White Lioness keeps you on the knife-edge of suspense. 


Ohh, this sounds like a fun read. Added to the wishlist!

weeklylizard:

“‎The game had started. Everybody was assuring everybody else how reliable they were. In fact, nobody trusted anybody but themselves” 

― Henning Mankell, The White Lioness

The execution-style murder of a Swedish housewife looks like a simple case even though there is no obvious suspect. But then Wallander learns of a determined stalker, and soon enough, the cops catch up with him. But when his alibi turns out to be airtight, they realize that what seemed a simple crime of passion is actually far more complex—and dangerous. The search for the truth behind the killing eventually uncovers an assassination plot, and Wallander soon finds himself in a tangle with both the secret police and a ruthless foreign agent. Combining compelling insights into the sinister side of modern life with a riveting tale of international intrigue, The White Lioness keeps you on the knife-edge of suspense. 

Ohh, this sounds like a fun read. Added to the wishlist!

(Source: vintagecrimeblacklizard, via vintageanchorbooks)

escondidolibrary:

Happy Earth Day!
Go Outside and Read!

escondidolibrary:

Happy Earth Day!

Go Outside and Read!

(via libraryadvocates)

Bait & Switch: 5 Books That Sound like They’re About Food but Totally Aren’t

blackballoonpublishing:

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For the gourmand with a literary bend, joining the love of food and reading is an irresistible proposition. We’ve already served up some tasty tomes starring food, but while the likes of Calvin Trillin, Michael Pollan and Ruth Reichl may have your inner gastronome salivating, you can’t always judge a book by its title. From vice and poverty to examinations of popular culture, we’ve rounded up five great reads that, in spite of their appetizing titles, are definitely not about food.

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1. Ham on Rye by Charles Bukowski
If there’s a polar opposite of a foodie book, Ham on Rye is a clear contender. The fourth of Bukowski’s Henry Chinaski novels, it’s a coming-of-age story based largely on Bukowski’s early days in depression-era L.A. Told in that raw, slept-in-the-gutter voice readers have come to either love or hate, it reads like a memoir. Bukowski’s life bleeds so thoroughly into Chinaski’s that it’s often hard to figure out where truth becomes fiction. Between tales of his abusive father and teen years marred by alienation and disfiguring acne, it’s an illuminating glimpse into the creation of the angry-drunk Chinaski previously seen in Post Office, Women and Factotum, but it also serves as an origin story for the Bard of Skid Row himself.

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2. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
If anything, The Grapes of Wrath suffers from a heartrending dearth of food, but the book that put a face to the plight of displaced farmers during the dust bowl is arguably “The” Great American Novel. Steinbeck takes us from the barren farms of Oklahoma to the de facto refugee camps in California, following Tom Joad, who returns from a prison stretch to find his family relinquishing their land to the bank. The Joads pack up what they can and head west for the promise of fruit-picking work, only to be met with disdain. Weaving elements of journalism into the narrative, Steinbeck shines a light on shady businessmen, classism and exploitation of the nation’s most vulnerable. Even 75 years later, it’s as resounding as ever, notably inspiring “The Ghost of Tom Joad,” one of Bruce Springteen’s more chilling odes to the working man.

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3. Under Milk Wood by Dylan Thomas
Thomas’s beautifully lyrical paean to a small fishing town on the Welsh ocean-side was the tragic poet’s final work. In it, readers (or listeners – Richard Burton famously led the “play for voices” on BBC radio) are dropped into a darkened town to witness the dreams of the sleeping townspeople: a sea captain haunted by drowned shipmates, a widow remembering departed loves, a schoolmaster fantasizing about poisoning his wife. The play itself is darkly humorous and unspeakably resonant. The concept for the radio play had been simmering in Thomas’ brain for 20 years before he completed Under Milk Wood, in the spring of 1953. Just months later, while in New York, he drank himself into a fatal coma.

KEEP READING …

lalunetteprismatique replied to your post “Had one of those super realistic dream moments right before I actually…”

Are you taking the position?

I woke up when I tried to say yes, and realized that I was holding my phone to my face but it was still on the lock screen. 

I have been known to take calls in my sleep, so I was a bit panicked before it dawned on me that no HR department from a publishing house would be calling at 7ish in the morning. I did check my call log to make sure that I didn’t actually get a call though.